Mathematics on blackboards.
Via It’s OK To Be Smart

Mathematics on blackboards.

Via It’s OK To Be Smart

The Universe seems neither benign nor hostile, merely indifferent.

Carl Sagan

Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music.

Betrand Russel

BEAUTY OF MATHEMATICS (by PARACHUTES.TV)

Spacetime tells matter how to move; matter tells spacetime how to curve.

John Archibald Wheeler

imageoscillite:

Five metronomes started at different intervals fall into sync because SCIENCE!

explore-blog:

What science knew about Mars in 1953.
Pair with Carl Sagan, Ray Bradbury, and Arthur C. Clarke in conversation about Mars in 1971.

explore-blog:

What science knew about Mars in 1953.

Pair with Carl Sagan, Ray Bradbury, and Arthur C. Clarke in conversation about Mars in 1971.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

Richard Feynman lecture on the differences between Mathematicians and Physicists. No powerpoint used.

(Source: swalaskan)

biggerthanthesound:

Richard Feynman - Ode To A Flower

(Source: vimeo.com)

Science fiction is the kind of literature that a person interested in reality should be reading.

Isaac Asimov

explore-blog:

Our Friend the Atom – lovely vintage Disney science illustrations from 1956

explore-blog:

Our Friend the Atom – lovely vintage Disney science illustrations from 1956

(Source: , via explore-blog)

explore-blog:

Beautifully minimalist and abstract vintage science graphics from the back of books published by Time Inc.

Complement with these vintage science ads and Berenice Abbott’s minimalist, abstract science photography from the same era.

(Source: explore-blog)

Where are they?

Enrico Fermi (1943)

The Drake Equation: mathematical, philosophical and aesthetic beauty

The Drake equation is a mathematical equation used to estimate the number of detectable extraterrestrial civilizations in the Milky Way galaxy. It is used in the field of the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI). The equation was devised in 1961 by Frank Drake while at the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center.

N = R^{\ast} \cdot f_p \cdot n_e \cdot f_{\ell} \cdot f_i \cdot f_c \cdot L

where:

N = the number of civilizations in our galaxy with which communication might be possible (i.e. which are on our current past light cone);

and

R* = the average rate of star formation per year in our galaxy

fp = the fraction of those stars that have planets

ne = the average number of planets that can potentially support life per star that has planets

fℓ = the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop life at some point

fi = the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop intelligent life

fc = the fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space

L = the length of time for which such civilizations release detectable signals into space

(Source Wikipedia)

There’s beauty in this equation: mathematical, philosophical and aesthetic.

The BBC has a beautiful interactive infographics that explains how the Drake equation works in a visual way.

A Quick Proof That There Must Be Something Rather Than Nothing, for Modern People Who Lead Busy Lives

Suppose there were nothing.  Then there would be no laws; for laws, after all, are something.  If there were no laws, then everything would be permitted.  If everything were permitted, then nothing would be forbidden.  So if there were nothing, nothing would be forbidden.  Thus nothing is self-forbidding. 

Therefore, there must be something.  QED.

Jim Holt in Why Does The World Exist.